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ARRIVALS & NEWS  
Yes! We have all the newest ribbons and medals for your uniform:
Unless otherwise indicated all authorized variations are available.
Ribbons, miniature ribbons, large medals, miniature medals.

Coast Guard Combat Action #36G

Air Force Combat Action Medal #36C

Coast Guard Presidential Unit Citation
#CGPUC

Afghanistan Campaign Medal #812

Iraq Campaign Medal #813

Global War On Terrorism Expeditionary Medal #81L

Global War On Terrorism Service Medal #81S

Korea Defense Service Medal #KDSM

Air and Space Campaign Medal #86M

Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon #88M

9-11 Guardian Medal (CG) #10A

9-11 Medal (Coast Guard Only) #30A
(ribbon only)

9-11 Ribbon (Coast Guard Only) #82M
(ribbon only)

Cold War Medal #CWM
(not authorized for wear, current information)


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Presidential Unit Citation Awarded to Coast Guard.

On May 25, 2006 President Bush announced that the Presidential Unit Citation would be awarded to the US Coast Guard for services during and after hurricane Katrina devastated the gulf coast.

Exact recipient award requirements will be determined and announced by the Coast Guard, but it is expected that any person on active duty will be authorized to wear. Many reservists may also meet the requirements.

Ultra-Thin Coast Guard Presidential Unit Citation with Hurricane Device Image

The first award of the new ribbon will have the hurricane device for service during Hurricane Katrina as shown on the right image above. For future awards, the ribbon may be awarded with no device or with another new device prescribed by the Coast Guard.

The Presidential Unit Citation is the highest award which can be bestowed upon a unit. When worn, the ribbon will take precedence just above the DOT Outstanding Unit (Gold) Award and just below the Coast Guard Commandant's Letter of Commendation.

Available now, the ribbon is #38B and the attachment HA.

go directly to the Rack Builder.

Iraq Campaign Medal
Afghanistan Campaign Medal
the Iraq Campaign Medal shall be awarded to members of the uniformed services of the United States who serve or have served in Iraq or contiguous waters or air space, as defined by such regulations, on or after March 19, 2003, and before a terminal date to be prescribed by the Secretary of Defense.
The Afghanistan Campaign Medal shall be awarded to members of the uniformed services of the United States who serve or have served in Afghanistan or contiguous air space, as defined by such regulations, on or after October 24, 2001, and before a terminal date to be prescribed by the Secretary of Defense.
Ultra-Thin Iraq Campaign Medal Image   Ultra-Thin Afghanistan Campaign Medal Image  
   

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On March 12, 2004, President Bush issued an executive order establishing two military awards for actions in the global war on terrorism:

Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal

This medal will be awarded to service members who serve in military expeditions to combat terrorism on or after Sept. 11, 2001. Operation Enduring Freedom is the prime operation the medal may be awarded for. Personnel assigned to operations in Afghanistan and the Philippines are examples of service members who will receive the award.
 
Ultra-Thin Global War on Terrorism Obverse

 

Ultra-Thin Global War on Terrorism Reverse

RIBBON:  Scarlet, white and blue represent the United States. Light blue refers to worldwide cooperation against terrorism. Gold denotes excellence.

OBVERSE:  A bronze color metal disc charged with a shield adapted from the Great Seal of the United States surmounting two swords hilts to base saltirewise enclosed within a wreath of laurel; overall an eagle, wings displayed, grasping in its claws a serpent. The shield and eagle represent the United States. The swords denote readiness and the resolve to fight international terrorism, which is symbolized by the serpent crushed in the eagle's claws. The wreath denotes honor and achievement.

REVERSE:  The eagle, serpent and swords from the front of the medal within the encircling inscription "War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal."

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Global War on Terrorism
Service Medal

 
The Global War on Terrorism Service Medal will be awarded to service members who serve in military operations to combat terrorism on or after Sept. 11, 2001. Operation Noble Eagle is an example of the type of operation the medal may be awarded for.
 
 
 
Ultra-Thin Global War on Terrorism Service Medal

 

RIBBON:  Scarlet, white and blue represent the United States. Gold denotes excellence.

OBVERSE:  A bronze color metal disc charged with an eagle, wings displayed, with a stylized shield of thirteen vertical bars on its breast and holding in dexter claw an olive branch and in sinister claw three arrows, all in front of a terrestrial globe with the inscription above, "WAR ON TERRORISM SERVICE MEDAL." The eagle and shield, adapted from the Great Seal, represents the United States. They protect the globe above and behind, symbolizing American resolve to combat and overcome global elements of international terrorism. The laurel wreath represents the drive for peace. The three arrows signify vigilance, resolve, and peace.

REVERSE:  A laurel wreath on a plain field.

Recently an e-mail began making the rounds stating that a medal had been approved for wear, displaying this image as the "official" Cold War Medal and providing information from House Resolution 2165 (13 June 2001) as authorization to wear it.

The medal depicted is a 'commemorative medal' designed and produced by a private organization. Quoting from their web site..."Congress did not specifically authorize a medal for Federal service during the cold war, but limited its official recognition to the Cold War Recognition Certificate. This medal is intended for use by State Guard organizations, military and patriotic societies, and by private citizens who served during the Cold War"

The 'official document' sent along with the email is a page from the web site http://thomas.loc.gov showing information on House Resolution 2165 in which Mr. Spence proposes that Title 10 of the US Code be modified to authorize "a medal" (not necessarily, and highly unlikely, the one shown above) to represent a member's service during the cold war. The bill was then forwarded to the Armed Services Committee where it has sat with no action since June. You can follow the official action on this bill at http://thomas.loc.gov and typing "cold war medal" in the text search criteria.

 

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